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The 2016 Minnesota Twins Top 10 Prospects

Announcement: After peaking as the #3 book among all baseball books on Amazon last year, my new book, The 2016 Prospect Digest Handbook, is on sale! Check it out here!

And for those wondering what CALs are, here’s an article on the Comparison And Likeness program I designed.

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1. Byron Buxton, CF                                                        
Born: 12/18/93 Age: 22 Bats: R Top CALs: Christian Yelich, Brett Phillips,

Aaron Cunningham, Brett Jackson, Justin Upton

Height: 6-2 Weight: 190 Throws: R
 

Season Age LVL PA 2B 3B HR AVG OBP SLG ISO BB% K% wRC+
2013 19 A 321 15 10 8 0.341 0.431 0.559 0.219 13.7% 17.4% 176
2013 19 A+ 253 4 8 4 0.326 0.415 0.472 0.147 12.6% 19.4% 155
2014 20 A+ 134 4 2 4 0.240 0.313 0.405 0.165 7.5% 24.6% 106
2015 21 AA 268 7 12 6 0.283 0.351 0.489 0.207 9.7% 19.0% 135
2015 21 AAA 59 3 1 1 0.400 0.441 0.545 0.145 6.8% 20.3% 190
2015 21 MLB 138 7 1 2 0.209 0.250 0.326 0.116 4.3% 31.9% 54

Background: Let’s run down the litany of baseball bruises – and so much worse – that Buxton’s succumbed to over the past couple of seasons:

  • The former #2 overall pick injured his shoulder after a dominant, breakout showing in 2013. The cause, according to the club’s press release, was swinging a bat.
  • Buxton would injure his wrist in Spring Training the following season, an injury that would hamper the top prospect for the next several months.
  • In mid-August, Buxton, finally shaking off the effects of the wrist injury, collided with a diving Mike Kvasnicka, a impact so forceful that the club’s promising center fielder was rendered unconscious for approximately 10 minutes and eventually left the park via an ambulance. Buxton would be diagnosed with a concussion and would miss nearly two months before making it back to the Arizona Fall League.
  • Eleven games into his big league debut Buxton injured his thumb and would eventually miss about six weeks of action before returning back to the International League for a quick refresher.

Now onto the stats from last season: Back in Class AA after his brief – very brief – one-game stint the previous season, Buxton batted a solid .283/.351/.489 with seven doubles, 12 triples, six homeruns and 20 stolen bases (in 22 attempts) in 58 games before his big league call up. And then after the injury he slugged .400/.441/.545 in 13 games in Class AAA. But his work in Minnesota leaves a lot to be desired: .209/.250/.326.

Projection: Fun fact: his 12 triples with Chattanooga tied for the third most in the Southern League last season – despite playing in fewer than 60 games. Easily the most explosive two-way prospect since Mike Trout tore through the minors. Buxton offers up an array of above-average to plus tools across the board. So much so, in fact, here’s what I wrote in last year’s book:

“Earlier in [2014] I described Buxton’s offensive ceiling as Barry Bonds-esque circa the Pittsburgh Pirates, particularly his 1992 season in which he hit .311/.456/.624 with 36 doubles, five triples, 34 homeruns, and 38 stolen bases.”

His work with Chattanooga is the true talent level, so why change the why praise now? Finally, one bold prediction: In 2017 Buxton’s going to top a 145 wRC+ total at the big league level.

Ceiling: 7.5-win player

Risk: Moderate

MLB ETA: Debuted in 2015

 

2. Jose Berrios, RHP                                                          
Born: 05/27/94 Age: 22 Bats: R Top CALs: Johnny Cueto, Eduardo Sanchez,

Eduardo Rodriuez, Josh Hader, Sean Gallagher

Height: 6-0 Weight: 185 Throws: R
 

YEAR Age Level IP W L ERA FIP K/9 BB/9 K% BB% HR/9 LOB%
2013 19 A 103.7 7 7 3.99 3.58 8.68 3.47 22.0% 8.8% 0.52 65.9%
2014 20 A+ 96.3 9 3 1.96 2.51 10.18 2.15 28.0% 5.9% 0.37 76.5%
2014 20 AA 40.7 3 4 3.54 3.65 6.20 2.66 17.2% 7.4% 0.44 67.9%
2014 20 AAA 3.0 0 1 18.00 4.36 9.00 9.00 15.8% 15.8% 0.00 40.0%
2015 21 AA 90.7 8 3 3.08 3.09 9.13 2.38 25.1% 6.5% 0.60 75.8%
2015 21 AAA 75.7 6 2 2.62 2.79 9.87 1.67 27.7% 4.7% 0.71 77.9%

Background: While he didn’t make his big league debut last season, the promising right-hander came awfully damn close. A breakout prospect two years ago, Berrios, who made stops at three different levels in 2014, began the year back in Class AA and quickly proved that he was ready for the next stop. In 15 starts with Chattanooga, the 6-foot southpaw punched out 92 and walked just 24 in 90.2 innings of work. The organization bumped him up to Rochester for the remainder of the season – a final 12 starts – where he fanned nearly 28% and walked just 4.7% of the batters he faced. His overall 2015 stat line: 166.1 innings, 175 punch outs, just 38 walks, and a neat-and-tidy 2.87 ERA. For his career, Berrios has fanned 25.7% and walked 6.6% of the total batters he’s faced.

Projection: Berrios would easily be the most talked about right-hander in the minor leagues – if it weren’t for the Dodgers’ Lucas Giolito. Proof is in the pudding: among all minor league hurlers with at least 150+ innings in 2015, his strikeout percentage, 26.2%, and strikeout-to-walk percentage, 20.5%, both ranked first. Berrios possesses an above-average to plus-heater, something he displayed during his second Futures Game appearance last season. Above-average control, success dominance against older competition, and a healthy track record; name it and he possesses it. He’ll hover around front-of-the-rotation status, even if he never ascends to Johnny Cueto (his top CAL) levels.

Ceiling: 4.0- to 4.5-win player

Risk: Moderate

MLB ETA: 2016

 

3. Tyler Jay, LHP                                                                   
Born: 04/19/94 Age: 22 Bats: L Top CALs: Jose Ortega, Abel De Los Santos,

Joey Krehbiel, Casey Mulligan, Daniel Stange

Height: 6-1 Weight: 180 Throws: L
 

YEAR Age Level IP W L ERA FIP K/9 BB/9 K% BB% HR/9 LOB%
2015 21 A+ 18.3 0 1 3.93 2.07 10.80 3.93 27.2% 9.9% 0.00 61.5%

Background: Apparently the Alex Wimmers selection had a bit of a lasting effect on the organization, because Jay, a hard-throwing southpaw out of the University of Illinois, was the first time the club took a collegiate arm with their first pick since 2010. The lanky lefty spent the overwhelming majority of his collegiate career working out of the Illini’s bullpen. To be exact, all but two of his 71 career appearances were of the relief variety. Jay was nearly unhittable of his last two seasons: he tallied 123 punch outs and coughed out 20 free passes over his final 108.1 innings. For his amateur career, Jay averaged 9.98 K/9 and 2.09 BB/9. He also spent the summer of 2014 working out of the pen for Team USA, where he posted a 21-to-6 strikeout-to-walk ratio in 16.2 innings.

Projection: Prior to the draft I wrote the following:

“Despite [Coach] Hartlieb’s erroneous decision to leave the dominant southpaw in the pen during his final season, Jay will likely become the school’s highest drafted player in history. Former right-hander John Ericks is the university’s only [other] first rounder (22nd overall).

For his part, Jay offers up an incredible package of strong control, better-than-average swing-and-miss ability, and a tremendous [talent] to keep the ball in the park; he’s allowed just two homeruns over his last 93.0 innings of work.

There’s some obvious risk that comes along, namely, will Jay be able to handle the rigors of not only taking the ball every fifth day, but also hurling more than a couple innings in each outing? [He’s] mid-rotation caliber ceiling with the floor as a better version of Kyle Crockett, the former fourth round pick by the Indians who vaulted through the minor leagues.”

Ceiling: 3.0-win player

Risk: Moderate

MLB ETA: 2017

 

4. Alex Meyer, RHP                                                            
Born: 01/03/90 Age: 26 Bats: R Top CALs: Randy Wells, C.J. Riefenhauser,

Alex Wilson, heath Hembree, Garrett Olson

Height: 6-9 Weight: 225 Throws: R
 

YEAR Age Level IP W L ERA FIP K/9 BB/9 K% BB% HR/9 LOB%
2013 23 R 8.3 0 0 1.08 0.70 17.28 3.24 47.1% 8.8% 0.00 90.0%
2013 23 AA 70.0 4 3 3.21 2.85 10.80 3.73 28.1% 9.7% 0.39 71.8%
2014 24 AAA 130.3 7 7 3.52 3.66 10.57 4.42 27.1% 11.3% 0.69 74.7%
2015 25 AAA 92.0 4 5 4.79 3.28 9.78 4.70 23.9% 11.5% 0.39 67.4%

Background: It took a couple years of consistently grabbing the ball every week in college, but Meyer – and his massive 6-foot-9 frame – turned himself into a viable starting pitcher, or at least one that wouldn’t walk half-a-dozen batters every nine innings. The problem, of course, is that Meyer’s control never really took another step forward as it’s remained firmly in the below-average or worse category. And his work with Rochester in the International League was just the latest example. Acquired in the one-for-one swap with Washington a couple years back for Denard Span, Meyer’s 2015 campaign got off on a rocky start as he coughed up 31 earned runs across his first eight starts while posting a hideous 41-to-24 strikeout-to-walk ratio. The organization pushed him into a full time relief role for the remainder of the season and, lo and behold, his production spiked: across his next nine games Meyer allowed one earned run to go along with his spectacular 20-to-6 strikeout-to-walk ratio, a stretch that would earn him a (brief) trip to Minneapolis for two games. Overall, Meyer would finish his year with by whiffing 23.9% and walking 11.5% of the Class AAA batters he faced.

Projection: Officially among the largest human beings to ever don a Major League uniform, Meyer has a whole helluva lot of moving parts to control; thus explaining his problematic control. But I would like to point one thing out: Randy Johnson didn’t become Randy Johnson until his age-29 season. Just take a look:

Player Ages IP BB/9 K/9
Randy Johnson 24-28 818.0 5.7 9.0
Randy Johnson 29+ 3317.1 2.7 11.0

And that includes leading baseball in free passes for three consecutive seasons. Now, is Meyer the next Randy Johnson? Certainly not. But just ask yourself this question: If Randy Johnson was coming up through the minors in today’s age of deep, specialized bullpens, would he have been given more than 800 innings at the big league level – with a walk rate approach 6.0 BB/9 – to figure it out? Certainly not. With that being said, I’m still a big, big fan – no pun intended – of Meyer. He unleashed a mid- to upper-90s fastball during his debut, which only plays up due to his massive wing span, and he has the build to chew up plenty of meaningful innings. Sure, he’s entering his age-26 season but let’s see if the kid can figure it out. He is in the right organization for that. At the very least, he’s a dominant, shutdown closer.

Ceiling: 3.0-win player

Risk: Moderate to High

MLB ETA: Debuted in 2015

 

5. Max Kepler, 1B/OF                                             
Born: 02/10/93 Age: 23 Bats: L Top CALs: Sean Henry, Gregory Polanco,

Casey Craig, Dwight Smith, Aaron Cunningham

Height: 6-4 Weight: 205 Throws: L
 

Season Age LVL PA 2B 3B HR AVG OBP SLG ISO BB% K% wRC+
2013 20 A 263 11 3 9 0.237 0.312 0.424 0.186 9.1% 16.3% 105
2014 21 A+ 407 20 6 5 0.264 0.333 0.393 0.129 8.4% 15.2% 109
2015 22 A+ 26 2 0 0 0.250 0.308 0.333 0.083 7.7% 19.2% 97
2015 22 AA 482 32 13 9 0.322 0.416 0.531 0.209 13.9% 13.1% 167
2015 22 MLB 7 0 0 0 0.143 0.143 0.143 0.000 0.0% 42.9% -33

Background: Another one of the club’s baby-faced youngsters to debut last season, I listed the German-born first baseman/outfielder among my Top 25 Breakout Prospects for2015. And he did just that. In. A. Huge. Way. In 482 trips to the plate for Chattanooga, Kepler torched the opposition to the tune of .322/.416/.531 with 32 doubles (4th best mark in the Southern League), 13 triples (2nd best), nine homeruns, and a league-leading 167 wRC+. Kepler saw just three games in Minnesota, making seven plate appearances, and going 1-for-7. For his minor league career Kepler is sporting a steady .281/.362/.445 triple-slash line, slugging 98 doubles, 31 triples, and 34 homeruns in 427 total games.

Projection: In last year’s book I wrote:

“CAL offers more hope than one would suspect based on his numbers. Of his top five comparisons, three – Jake Marisnick, Josh Reddick, and Gregory Polanco – have a shot or have already developed into league average or better players. And a fourth, Aaron Cunningham, carved out a nice enough career as a fourth/fifth outfielder. Kepler’s power has stagnated after his 2012 season grading out as slightly better than average. He’ll walk a little bit and swipe a couple bags. The hit tool is questionable now. Again, [he’s a] league average starter – maybe a tick better.”

Let’s take a look at that analysis, piece by piece. CAL still remains a rather big fan, tying him to Gregory Polanco and Desmond Jennings, who ranked as his sixth comparable. Kepler’s power still isn’t the over-the-fence-type; instead, he relies on gap-to-gap pop resulting in tons of doubles and triples. He did set a career high in walk rate (13.9%) and his hit tool jumped up to better-than-average. I’m still sticking with last year’s conclusion: league average to slightly better regular.

Ceiling: 2.5-win player

Risk: Moderate

MLB ETA: Debuted in 2015

 

6. Jorge Polanco, 2B/SS                                               
Born: 07/05/93 Age: 22 Bats: B Top CALs: Orlando Arcia, Daniel Robertson,

Jose Pirela, Tyler Pastornicky, Francisco Lindor

Height: 5-11 Weight: 200 Throws: R
 

Season Age LVL PA 2B 3B HR AVG OBP SLG ISO BB% K% wRC+
2013 19 A 523 32 10 5 0.308 0.362 0.452 0.144 8.0% 11.3% 127
2014 20 A+ 432 17 6 6 0.291 0.364 0.415 0.124 10.6% 13.9% 124
2014 20 AA 157 6 0 1 0.281 0.323 0.342 0.062 5.7% 17.8% 86
2015 21 AA 431 17 3 6 0.289 0.346 0.393 0.104 8.1% 14.6% 111
2015 21 AAA 94 6 0 0 0.284 0.309 0.352 0.068 4.3% 10.6% 88
2015 21 MLB 12 0 0 0 0.300 0.417 0.300 0.000 16.7% 8.3% 111

Background: A short, stocky switch-hitting middle infielder out of the Dominican Republic, Polanco fared much better in his return Class AA after his 37-game stint the previous season. He hit .289/.346/.393 with 17 doubles, three triples, and half a dozen dingers in his 95 games with Chattanooga. Minnesota bumped him up to Rochester for another 22 games (.284/.309/.352).

Projection: Well, CAL’s certainly a huge fan, comparing the young shortstop/second baseman to one budding All-Star (Francisco Lindor) and another pair of promising prospects (Orlando Arcia and Daniel Robertson). Polanco’s power has stagnated over the past couple of years as he’s been aggressively pushed up the minor league chain, but the skill should develop into at least an average offering at the big league level once he’s finished filling out. He has solid-average or better tools across the board, as well as the potential to develop into a similar big league player.

Ceiling: 2.5-win player

Risk: Moderate

MLB ETA: Debuted in 2014

 

7. Stephen Gonsalves, LHP                                           
Born: 07/08/94 Age: 21 Bats: L Top CALs: Drew Hutchison, Lucas Giolito,

David Holmberg, Joey Krehbiel, Luis Severino

Height: 6-5 Weight: 190 Throws: L
 

YEAR Age Level IP W L ERA FIP K/9 BB/9 K% BB% HR/9 LOB%
2013 18 R 14.0 1 1 1.29 1.29 13.50 2.57 38.2% 7.3% 0.00 85.7%
2013 18 R 14.3 1 0 0.63 2.41 11.30 4.40 32.1% 12.5% 0.00 93.3%
2014 19 R 29.0 2 0 2.79 3.36 8.07 3.10 22.8% 8.8% 0.31 67.5%
2014 19 A 36.7 2 3 3.19 2.50 10.80 2.70 29.3% 7.3% 0.25 63.4%
2015 20 A 55.0 6 1 1.15 2.10 12.60 2.45 36.8% 7.2% 0.33 88.5%
2015 20 A+ 79.3 7 2 2.61 3.58 6.24 4.31 16.5% 11.4% 0.23 77.3%

Background: Hailing from the same high school as former #1 pick – and later #17th overall – Brady Aiken, Gonsalves continues to make scouts, analysts, and prognosticators take notice. The big southpaw made it look easy in 28.1 innings across both rookie ball levels during his debut (0.95 ERA, 39 strikeouts, and 11 walks), breezed through a second round of the Appalachian League and a brief stop with Cedar Rapids a year later, and made quick work of the Midwest and Florida State Leagues last season. In totality, Gonsalves made 24 starts in 2015, throwing 134.1 innings while fanning 132 and walking 53. He finished the year with an aggregate 2.01 ERA. For his career, he’s tallied a 2.17 ERA with a 241-to-85 strikeout-to-walk ratio in 228.1 innings of work.

Projection: CAL stands impressed, comparing him to established big leaguer Drew Hutchison and a pair of high-ceiling youngsters (Luis Severino and Lucas Giolito). And the trio of comparables is quite reasonable: Gonsalves has done nothing but succeede – often against older competition – since signing on the dotted line; his peripherals are above-average; and he does a fine job limiting the long ball (especially considering his groundball rates have been blasé). He’s a solid mid-rotation caliber arm who could jump up a bit as his lanky frame begins to fill out. Needless to say, Gonsalves has proven to be an incredible mid-round find for the organization.

Ceiling: 2.5-win player

Risk: Moderate

MLB ETA: 2017

 

8. Nick Gordon, SS                                                        
Born: 10/24/95 Age: 20 Bats: L Top CALs: Adrian Marin, Hak-Ju Lee,

Amed Rosario, Jose Pirela, Humberto Arteaga

Height: 6-0 Weight: 160 Throws: R
 

Season Age LVL PA 2B 3B HR AVG OBP SLG ISO BB% K% wRC+
2014 18 R 255 6 4 1 0.294 0.333 0.366 0.072 4.3% 17.6% 101
2015 19 A 533 23 7 1 0.277 0.336 0.360 0.083 7.3% 16.5% 104

Background: The son of former hard-throwing, sometimes dominant right-hander Tom “Flash” Gordon, the young Minnesota prospect not only has his famous father’s footsteps to walk in, but his older brother, Dee, is also setting the bar high by winning the batting title last year as well. The youngest Gordon, the fifth overall pick in 2014, cobbled together another solid, though far from spectacular stat line in 2015. In fact, I think we’ve seen this one before. Here are his 2014 statistics prorated for 120 games, the number of contests he appeared in with Cedar Rapids last season:

Year G AVG OBP SLG 2B 3B HR SB CS wRC+
2014 120 0.294 0.333 0.366 13 8 2 23 15 101
2015 120 0.277 0.336 0.360 23 7 1 25 8 104

Projection: After struggling for the first 45 games in his full season debut, Gordon, who batted .320/.305/.281 through the first two months of the season, hit a more-than-respectable .304/.355/.406 over his final 75 contests. The speed’s already an above-average tool, but he’s nowhere close to becoming the base thief that his older brother is. Nick doesn’t offer up a whole lot of power – even during his final 75 games his ISO barely cracked the .100-mark – so the hit tool will need to carry him the rest of the way. And CAL isn’t overly optimistic either, ranking him with several highly touted former top prospects that never figured it out.

Ceiling: 2.5-win player

Risk: Moderate to High

MLB ETA: 2018

 

9. Kohl Stewart, RHP                                                       
Born: 10/07/94 Age: 21 Bats: R Top CALs: Marwin Vega, Vin Mazzaro,

Brett Duvall, Clayton Cook, T.J. Mcfarland

Height: 6-3 Weight: 195 Throws: R
 

YEAR Age Level IP W L ERA FIP K/9 BB/9 K% BB% HR/9 LOB%
2013 18 R 4.0 0 0 0.00 0.93 18.00 2.25 53.3% 6.7% 0.00 100.0%
2013 18 R 16.0 0 0 1.69 2.21 9.00 1.69 23.2% 4.4% 0.00 56.3%
2014 19 A 87.0 3 5 2.59 3.73 6.41 2.48 17.2% 6.7% 0.41 69.7%
2015 20 A+ 129.3 7 8 3.20 3.45 4.94 3.13 12.8% 8.1% 0.14 67.0%

Background: For the second consecutive season the highly touted hurler out of St. Pius X High School (Houston, TX) succeeded against older competition despite some underwhelming, subpar peripherals. Stewart – the fourth overall pick in 2013 and the long time apple of the Twins’ eye – had a solid showing as a teenage arm with Cedar Rapids in the Midwest League two years ago; in an injury-shortened campaign the 6-foot-3 right-hander fanned 62, walked 24, and a 2.59 ERA in 87.0 innings of work. Stewart would follow that up with another odd showing in 2015. In 22 starts (129.1 IP), the hard-throwing right-hander fanned just 12.8% and walked 8.1% of the total batters he faced, but surprisingly enough he posted a sturdy 3.45 FIP.

Projection: Just to put this into a bit of perspective consider the following: only one other pitcher, New York Mets right-hander Kevin McGowan, finished with a worse strikeout-to-walk percentage among all qualified Florida State League hurlers. What makes Stewart so interesting – at least from an analytical perspective – is that he possesses an above-average fastball with a solid offering of secondary pitches, but still hasn’t missed a whole lot bats. He compensates for the lack of swings-and-misses by generating a ton of action on the ground (55% for his career). Statistically speaking, he looks like a backend arm. But his draft pedigree and overall athleticism suggest otherwise.

Ceiling: 2.5-win player

Risk: Moderate to High

MLB ETA: 2017

 

10. Nick Burdi, RHP                                                             
Born: 01/19/93 Age: 23 Bats: R Top CALs: Ethan Martin, Dan Cortes,

Paul Voelker, Cody Satterwhite, Ben Lively

Height: 6-5 Weight: 215 Throws: R
 

YEAR Age Level IP W L ERA FIP K/9 BB/9 K% BB% HR/9 LOB%
2014 21 A 13.0 0 0 4.15 1.33 18.00 5.54 48.2% 14.8% 0.00 62.5%
2014 21 A+ 7.3 2 0 0.00 1.35 14.73 2.45 42.9% 7.1% 0.00 100.0%
2015 22 A+ 20.0 2 2 2.25 1.37 13.05 1.35 39.7% 4.1% 0.45 58.8%
2015 22 AA 43.7 3 4 4.53 3.99 11.13 6.60 26.3% 15.6% 0.62 69.8%

Background: It was such an up-and-down season for the 2014 second round pick – literally in every sense of the word. Another one of my picks for the Top 25 Breakout Prospects, Burdi opened the year on a sour note: his first game of the season he lasted less than one inning, but the hard-throwing former Louisville closer managed to cough up four earned runs and four base-on-balls. And that’s pretty much how it went for the next 12 or so weeks, a span covering 30+ innings and a horribly grotesque 5.93 ERA. The front office bounced him down to High Class A for a bit of a breather – or to stop the bleeding – and Burdi looked like the hurler I envisioned: 20.0 innings of work, a tidy, barely-there 1.37 FIP, 29 punch outs, and just three walks. The dominance convinced the club to push him back up to Class AA for the season’s last couple of weeks. And, lo and behold, he continued to dominate: 13.1 IP, 1.35 ERA, 21 strikeouts, and 10 walks.

Projection: Here’s what I wrote prior to his selection in the 2014 draft:

“Craig Kimbrel of the collegiate ranks – a pitcher that simply overpowers the competition with an elite ability to miss bats with a strong enough feel for the strike zone. His control has been steadily improving in each of his last seasons, going from 3.97 BB/9 in 2011 to 3.28 as a sophomore and finally 3.12 BB/9 this season (as of 4/16/14).

Perhaps the most impressive stat, however, is the number one. The big right-hander’s surrendered just one homerun in his first 75.2 career innings. Near big league-ready, he should be among this class’ first waves to [The Show]. Big, big strikeout ability with the potential to average nearly a punch and a half per inning. He’s a very safe selection in terms of big league potential, though his career value will ultimately fall short in comparison with players like Carlos Rodon and Casey Gilaaspie.”

Burdi’s production from July 2nd through the end of the year – 33.1, 1.89 ERA, 50 K, and 13 BB – is the true talent level, definitely not the hurler that battled control issues in the first half. As I wrote two years ago, the burly 6-foot-5 Burdi is going to be a force to be reckoned with at the big league level. And soon.

Ceiling: 1.5- to 2.0-win player

Risk: Low to Moderate

MLB ETA: 2016

 

 

Note: All statistics courtesy of FanGraphs.com.



About

After serving as a video scout/analyst for Baseball Info Solutions, Joe Werner began writing at his original site, ReleasePoints.com. He’s since transitioned into his current niche, prospect analysis, at ProspectDigest.com. He has been fortunate — and incredibly blessed — to have some of his work published and mentioned by several major media outlets, including: ESPN, Cleveland.com and the Baseball Research Journal. He can be reached at: JosephMWerner@yahoo.com.


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